taking things bird by bird -- 6/19/15

We are celebrating our tenth anniversary! All month we will be sending Delanceyplace.com encores that our subscribers picked as their favorites, starting with the top ten Delanceyplace.com excerpts, followed by ten more favorites. Thanks for reading and enjoy!

Ten More Favorites!

Today's encore selection -- from Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. Advice from author and teacher Anne Lamott on how to write when the prospect of writing overwhelms you and causes you to procrastinate. Her advice seems applicable to all types of projects beyond writing -- and to life itself:

"The first useful concept is the idea of short assignments. Often when you sit down to write, what you have in mind is an autobiographical novel about your childhood, or a play about the immigrant experience, or a history of -- oh, say -- say women. But this is like trying to scale a glacier. It's hard to get your footing, and your fingertips get all red and frozen and torn up. Then your mental illnesses arrive at the desk like your sickest, most secretive relatives. And they pull up chairs in a semicircle around the computer, and they try to be quiet but you know they are there with their weird coppery breath, leering at you behind your back.

"What I do at this point, as the panic mounts and the jungle drums begin beating and I realize that the well has run dry and that my future is behind me and I'm going to have to get a job only I'm completely unemployable, is to stop. First I try to breathe, because I'm either sitting there panting like a lapdog or I'm unintentionally making slow asthmatic death rattles. So I just sit there for a minute, breathing slowly, quietly. I let my mind wander. After a moment I may notice that I'm trying to decide whether or not I am too old for orthodontia and whether right now would be a good time to make a few calls, and then I start to think about learning to use makeup and how maybe I could find some boyfriend who is not a total and complete fixer-upper and then my life would be totally great and I'd be happy all the time, and then I think about all the people I should have called back before I sat down to work, and how I should probably at least check in with my agent and tell him this great idea I have and see if he thinks it's a good idea, and see if he thinks I need orthodontia -- if that is what he is actually thinking whenever we have lunch together. Then I think about someone I'm really annoyed with, or some financial problem that is driving me crazy, and decide that I must resolve this before I get down to today's work. ... But all of this only takes somewhere between one and two minutes, so I haven't actually wasted that much time. Still, it leaves me winded. I go back to trying to breathe, slowly and calmly, and I finally notice the one-inch picture frame that I put on my desk to remind me of short assignments.

"It reminds me that all I have to do is to write down as much as I can see through a one-inch picture frame. This is all I have to bite off for the time being. All I am going to do right now, for example, is write that one paragraph that sets the story in my hometown, in the late fifties, when the trains were still running. I am going to paint a picture of it, in words, on my word processor. Or all I am going to do is to describe the main character the very first time we meet her, when she first walks out the front door and onto the porch. I am not even going to describe the expression on her face when she first notices the blind dog sitting behind the wheel of her car -- just what I can see through the one-inch picture frame, just one paragraph describing this woman, in the town where I grew up, the first time we encounter her.

"E. L. Doctorow once said that 'writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can see only as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.' You don't have to see where you're going, you don't have to see your des­tination or everything you will pass along the way. You just have to see two or three feet ahead of you. This is right up there with the best advice about writing, or life, I have ever heard.

"So after I've completely exhausted myself thinking about the people I most resent in the world, and my more arresting financial problems, and, of course, the orthodontia, I remember to pick up the one-inch picture frame and to figure out a one-inch piece of my story to tell, one small scene, one memory, one exchange. I also remember a story that I know I've told elsewhere but that over and over helps me to get a grip: thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he'd had three months to write, which was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother's shoulder, and said, 'Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.'"


author:

Anne Lamott

title:

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

publisher:

Anchor Books

date:

Copyright 1994 by Anne Lamott

pages:

16-19
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COMMENTS (2)

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mbrownmdb@gmail.com

June 19, 2015
I love this little piece of writing. I laughed several times -- I related to it, I saw myself in it. I probably will buy the book. This author "gets" me. -- With so much negativity in the world I just don't understand why a person who calls himself "jet jeff" should find the need to criticize this article. So in like kind, but hopefully with more kindness . . . have you never heard of metaphor? Have you never seen simile, or comparison? As I am sure you know, driving in a dense fog is difficult - if the visibility distance is 10 feet or 100 feet or 1000 feet. It is unsafe. It is advisable to not drive at all in such conditions. Air planes do not land in this -- they go to other airports where things are clear. These conditions are the makings of car crash pile-ups involving over 100 cars. One must proceed cautiously if one desires to make it through it alive, or at least, with car and person in tact. It is a MUST to take it one little piece at a time. I can tell that you are very intelligent, and if you have respect for the Lord (as is implied by your reference to Him), you could serve yourself and mankind better by looking for ways to be constructive with your time and your words. God bless you and I'll pray for you. May your heart be changed. (P.S. Please consider going to Al-Anon as it may help your life to improve greatly. You will learn that you don't have to belittle others in order to think well of yourself. Go out of your way to help someone else today to offset your earlier negativity.)

setjeff@hotmail.com

June 19, 2015
Lord have mercy. Another self-aggrandizing henkie.
Oh, and dearie, if you can only see two, or three, feet ahead of you while driving at night, get off the hooch ... throw away the medicine ... or stop cooking the Meth.


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